Understanding Kidney Disease

Kidney Disease Spotlight

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a gradual loss of kidney function

Kidneys are Vital Organs in your Body

Kidneys are the primary functional organ of the urinary system, filtering approximately 200 quarts of blood and eliminating waste every day. Kidneys are a master regulator that ensure the body has the proper balance of water and necessary chemicals and minerals, keeping what’s needed and getting rid of what’s not.

Kidneys are the primary functional organ of the urinary system, filtering approximately 200 quarts of blood and eliminating waste every day. Kidneys are a master regulator that ensure the body has the proper balance of water and necessary chemicals and minerals, keeping what’s needed and getting rid of what’s not.

The kidneys also produce hormones that support the function of other organs in the body, including hormones that support the production of healthy red blood cells, which are necessary to carry oxygen throughout the body; their role in regulating composition of blood affects virtually every part of the body.

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A Closer Look At Chronic Kidney Disease

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a top 10 leading cause of death in the United States and each year kidney disease takes more lives than breast cancer or prostate cancer. It is a growing epidemic and more than one in seven U.S. adults are living with the disease.

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a top 10 leading cause of death in the United States and each year kidney disease takes more lives than breast cancer or prostate cancer. It is a growing epidemic and more than one in seven U.S. adults are living with the disease.

CKD is a complex disease with multiple causes and effects; however, nearly three-quarters of all cases are caused by diabetes and/or hypertension. Approximately one of every three adults with diabetes and one of every five adults with high blood pressure also has CKD.  People with chronic kidney disease live with the burden of symptoms associated with the disease.

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Quick Facts

  • Chronic kidney disease is a growing problem in the U.S. due to an aging population and increasing prevalence of hypertension and diabetes
  • Diagnosis of chronic kidney disease early is the best way to improve outcomes. People diagnosed at stage 1-3 have fewer complications and better prognosis than patients diagnosed at stage 4-5
  • Chronic kidney disease is estimated to be more common in women than in men

Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease

References:

  1. Tortora G, Derrickson B. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology, 13th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons, Inc; 2012.
  2. NIH, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; https://www.niddk.nih.gov.
  3. Levin, Adeera. Global Kidney Health 2017 and beyond: a roadmap for closing gaps in care, research, and policy. The Lancet. Published online April 20, 2017, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(17)30788-2.
  4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). National chronic kidney disease fact sheet, 2017; https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/kidney_factsheet.pdf. Accessed June, 2017.
  5. National Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI). K/DOQI clinical practice guidelines for chronic kidney disease: evaluation, classification, and stratification. Am J Kidney Dis. 2002;39(2 Suppl 1):S1-266.
  6. Baumgarten M, Gehr T. Chronic Kidney Disease: detection and evaluation. Am Fam Physician. 2011;84(10):1138-1148.
  7. Taal M, Chertow G, Marsden P, Skorecki K, Yu A, Brenner B. Brenner and Rector’s The Kidney, 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA; Elsevier Saunders; 2012.
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